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Car crashes into Perry house


A Perry family sat down to watch football Sunday night and got a shock.

And it had nothing to do with the score.

Living right off Highway 341, Kelvin Ross and his family are no strangers to loud traffic. However, they were not prepared for what they heard Sunday night.

"Like a plane had crashed," Ross says. "Like a big boom!"

It was around 7:00 when he heard the "big boom."

"I thought it was an accident out on the main highway," he explains.

It was an accident in their own front yard.

"To see that car in my garage, it was just mind blowing," says Ross.

The car came across the highway and down a small hill before going through the Ross's yard. There are a few feet with no tire tread, where the car appears to have been airborne. The driver took out their water main and a tree before crashing into their garage.

Growing movie industry prompts filming policy in Perry


With the growing number of films in the Perry, city officials are creating filming policies for public spaces.

The goal of the policy is to take advantage of the growing film industry, and make sure the people who live there are safe.

Director of Economic Development, Robert Smith, says this Thursday he will propose the city's first plan.

"Before the film policy, it wasn't really clear who to contact in the event that they wanted to close roads or use public places," said Smith.

He says solidifying rules and simplifying procedures can lure more lenses to the city.

"That was probably one of the number one things we learned from other communities was if you make the process of them filming here in Perry easy, they're more likely to come back," said Smith.

He says Perry's amenities are also appetizing.

'Phenomenal Women' hit the court for New Year's Day


On New Year's Day, one group of ladies decided to hit the basketball court with Perry High's Junior Varsity girls team. The group calls themselves 'The Phenomenal Women.

Homeland Response Force trains at Guardian Center


With artificial wounds and walkers in tow, several guardsmen pretended to be casualties from a collapsed building.

It's training for the National Guard's Homeland Response Force at the Guardian Center in Perry.

"They're an asset that each FEMA region has in case of any disaster or incident," said Lieutenant Colonel Michael Maddox, "It doesn't just have to be a terrorist incident, it can also be a hurricane or a tornado or anything that involves mass casualties."

Maddox says Homeland Response Force, or HRF for short, steps in when first responders need help for large scale disasters.

There are 10 HRFs in the United States.

Ball Street open, lanes wider


Construction on the section of Ball Street between Main and Duncan Street in Perry is complete. Drivers used to the road will notice some big changes.

"It really needed some improvement. It was about 18 foot wide all together" said Chairman of Houston County Commission Tommy Stalnaker.

He says small lanes caused the most complaints. But now each lane is 3 feet wider, as well as some other additions

"They now have 23 street side parking spaces" said Stalnaker

Businesses in the area say they'll benefit from the increased parking

"Often times we would have clients circle the parking lot and have to end up parking down the street further" said John Hulbert of Walker Hulbert Gray& Moore law firm.

Five fun finds at Mistletoe Market


Perry's Mistletoe Market at the Georgia National Fairgrounds and Agricenter opened Friday morning, inside the Miller-Murphy-Howard Building.

Organizer, Lisa Hayes, says they have 221 vendor spaces, offering crafts, clothing, toys and much more.

Last year, more than 10,000 people came for the three-day show.

It costs $5 to get in the door. Once you buy a ticket, it's good for return trips.

Hayes says the money from admission fees goes to local charities including Jay's Hope, Abba House in Perry, and Grace Village in Perry. She said last year, they donated $47,000 to charity.

Watch the video to see some of the most interesting finds at this year's show.

Perdue: 'No Regrets' for Go Fish


It's been four years- a full gubernatorial term- since the Go Fish Education Center opened in Perry.

Former governor Sonny Perdue championed the $17 million aquarium as part of an effort to lure more fisherman, and their dollars, to Georgia.

On a recent morning, Hope Grumilla took a field trip with her Houston County class to Go Fish. They came eye-to-eye with creatures, that some of the students, only thought existed on computers.

Grumilla said, "I saw it on an iPad before, but not real."

The Go Fish Education Center offered that hands one experience to about 5,000 students last year.

That's precisely why Program Manager for Go Fish, Jeremy Wixson, says it exists.